Destination LA: Venice

Evolving from its early identities as beachside resort and city-wide pariah, Venice has reemerged as a hub of creativity and content, thanks to a handful of innovative tech companies Where to Eat Gjusta Part bakery, part deli, all local hang-out, Gjusta opened with no tables and no chairs but has since evolved into a can’t-miss […]

Destination LA: Venice
January 4, 2016

Evolving from its early identities as beachside resort and city-wide pariah, Venice has reemerged as a hub of creativity and content, thanks to a handful of innovative tech companies

Where to Eat

Gjusta

Part bakery, part deli, all local hang-out, Gjusta opened with no tables and no chairs but has since evolved into a can’t-miss for smoked meats, fishes, fresh breads, and more.

Leona

Top Chef alum Nyesha J. Arrington brightens our day by creating her own genre: progressive California Cuisine.

The Short Rib at Leona (Photo: Ryan Tanaka)

The Short Rib at Leona (Photo: Ryan Tanaka)

The Rose

The historic Venice café has reopened with new partners, Bill Chait and chef Jason Neroni.

The Tasting Kitchen

With a half decade on Abbot Kinney under its belt, The Tasting Kitchen continues to offer guests the best pasta west of The 405 and phenomenal cocktails by Justin Pike.

One of the Tasting Kitchen's many pasta offerings

One of the Tasting Kitchen’s many pasta offerings

Wallflower

Restaurateur Wayne Rambharose’s newest venture brings contemporary Southeast Asian flavors to mini-Kinney (Rose Avenue), serving breakfast, dinner, and weekend late-night hours.

Where to Drink

The Brig

The quintessential Venice bar, The Brig has been a cornerstone of the neighborhood for more than 60 years and was rewarded with an appearance in 2014’s indie-hit Chef. Try the Old Fashioned.

The Brig

The Brig

The Otheroom

With sister properties in Miami, Tribeca, and Echo Park, the Otheroom in Venice self-references as a place to meet. Try one of their several Mendoza Malbecs.

Würstkuche

A no-nonsense sausage and beer mecca that aims to satisfy and never misses. Try any of their several dozen beers on tap.

The taps are always flowing at Würstkuche

The taps are always flowing at Würstkuche

Where to Shop

Robert Graham

Established in 2001, Robert Graham sold its first shirt in Fred Segal and didn’t open its own brick-and-mortar until 2010, where you can find an abundant and eclectic mix of button downs.

Robert Graham, Venice

Robert Graham, Venice

Scotch & Soda

Originally a Dutch fashion brand in the ’80s, Scotch & Soda has continually evolved and today boasts over 100 stores and 7,000 points of sale worldwide. The Abbot Kinney storefront has all the bells and whistles and a great selection of denim.

Warby Parker

The clicks-to-bricks legend planted roots in Venice, opening its first free-standing Los Angeles locale in the heart of Abbot Kinney.

Warby Parker, Venice

Warby Parker, Venice

90291 Neighborhood Directory

The Brig
1515 Abbot Kinney Blvd.
310/399.7537
thebrig.com

Gjusta
320 Sunset Ave.
310/314.0320
gjusta.com

Leona
123 W. Washington Blvd.
310/822.5379
leonavenice.com

The Otheroom
1201 Abbot Kinney Blvd.
310/396.6230
theotheroom.net

Robert Graham
1326 Abbot Kinney Blvd.
310/396.1100
robertgraham.us

The Rose
220 Rose Ave.
310/399.0711
rosecafevenice.com

Scotch & Soda
1340 Abbot Kinney Blvd.
310/584.7593
scotch-soda.com

The Tasting Kitchen
1633 Abbot Kinney Blvd.
310/392.6644
thetastingkitchen.com

Wallflower
609 Rose Ave.
213/373.6609
wallflowervenice.com

Warby Parker
1422 Abbot Kinney Blvd.
310/280.2055
warbyparker.com

Würstkuche
625 Lincoln Blvd.
213/687.4444
wurstkuche.com

Historical Perspective

Historical Perspective

Present-day Venice was founded as Venice of America in 1904 by Abbot Kinney, a tobacco millionaire. When Venice of America officially opened on July 4, 1905, Kinney had dug several miles of canals, constructed an auditorium, restaurant, dance hall, and even a hot salt-water plunge. By 1910 the Kinney Pier became an amusement-oriented attraction that would stand until Kinney’s death in 1920. Despite the discovery of oil on the peninsula in 1929, the city of Venice soon found itself neglected by Los Angeles and by the 1950s became known as the “Slum by the Sea.” Today, Venice is in the midst of a cultural renaissance as Abbot Kinney Blvd. finds itself lined with boutiques, high-end restaurants, craft coffee houses, and more while some of the world’s most innovative and disruptive tech companies plant their roots and spread their wings along the boardwalk.

Want to get ahead with exclusive updates from CSQ? Join today.